5K Giveaway My Way

5K Giveaway thumb 1

Click “Read More” and scroll Down for the Official Entry Rules

Over the course of the last week, my humble little channel hit the 5000 subscriber milestone! I want to take this opportunity to say thank you to each and every one of you who have subscribed to my YouTube channelRead More

As a way of saying thank you to my subscribers, I’m announcing the 5K Giveaway Done My Way!

The rules are simple. To enter, you must be subscribed to my channel. You must live in the United States. You must leave a comment in the comment section of this video. That’s it!

Entries will close at 11:59pm, Sunday, February 17th, 2019. Limit of 1 entry per household.

On Wednesday, February 20th, 2019, I’ll select 3 random comments from the comment section. If any of those 3 commenters are not subscribers, I will keep selecting until I have confirmed that I have selected 3 subscribers.

I will post links in the description of the Live Stream on Wednesday, February 20th for the winners to message me. ONLY the messages from the winners will be replied to. Messages from others will be ignored.

First Prize will be the winner’s choice of any one (1) item from the Shop at my website – marklindsaycnc.com

Second and Third Prizes will be Mark Lindsay CNC coffee mugs, also from the Shop at my website – marklindsaycnc.com

That’s all there is to it, really.

In closing. I’d like to give my sincerest thanks to everyone who has subscribed to my channel for your continuous support. I’m grateful to each and every one of you.

Good luck, and y’all take care!

marklindsaycnc.com is sponsored by Harneal Media – a website developing company that specializes in websites for the maker community. Find out more at:

https://harnealmedia.com/

I’m a proud founding member of the Maker’s Media Network.

Come check us out at: http://makersmedianetwork.com/

Basic Bitmap Tracing and Node Editing – Part 15 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Part 15 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the fifteenth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

In this 15th video of the series, I’ll get a bit deeper into Bitmap Tracing within the Vectric software. We’ll import a rather simple color image into VCarve, and I’ll show you how to adjust the number of colors we want to trace in the bitmap. Then we’ll go in and do a little bit of image cleanup using the Node Editing mode. I’ll create a huge mess of everything by offsetting the design in an attempt to create a border for the image. After all of that, we’ll calculate a v-carve toolpath, a beveled profile, a cutout profile, and preview the project.



For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 15th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.512 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

Summing Up

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Basic Bitmap Tracing and Node Editing – Part 14 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Part 14 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the fourteenth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

In this 14th video of the series, I’ll demonstrate the basics of Bitmap Tracing within the Vectric software. I’ll give you my suggestions for what type of photo to use for your first few projects, then show you how to import an image into VCarve. I’ll then show you how to trace the bitmap, then we’ll go in and do a little bit of image cleanup. Next I’ll show you how I further edit the tracing using the Node Editing mode. Then we’ll calculate a v-carve toolpath, and preview the project.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to some, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 14th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.512 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

Summing Up

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Text Tips & Tricks – Part 13 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Part 13 Thumb

This article accompanies the thirteenth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

In this 13th video of the series, I’ll demonstrate several methods of manipulating text within the Vectric software. I compiled several questions I regularly get on the subject of working with text, and show you a number of solutions to common problems. I’ll show you a few things about vertical text and what the little @ symbol before a font’s name means. Next I’ll show you how to create text blocks of a specific size, converting text to curves, and a few other things. Then I’ll design a fun little project that would look good in the shop.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to some, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 13th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.512 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

Summing Up

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Adding and Using a Keyhole Bit – Part 12 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Keyhole Website Thumb

This article accompanies the twelfth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

In this 12th video of the series, by request, we’ll get into using a Keyhole Bit in the Vectric software. I’ll show you the information about the bit that I needed to get, then how to enter that info into the tool database. Next I’ll show you how I created the geometry I needed to create a 3/4” long vertical keyhole slot for a project. Then I’ll demonstrate calculating the toolpath from that geometry, previewing the toolpath, and saving the g-code.

From there we’ll move out onto the CNC router, where we’ll load the g-code into Mach3, set the X, Y, and Z zeros on our project, and cut a keyhole.

For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to some, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 12th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.512 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

Summing Up

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

 

Join Vectors Using Layers – Part 11 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Part 11 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the eleventh video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this 11th video of the series, we’ll update an older video of mine – using layers to help join open vectors in the Vectric software. I’ll show you how to copy vectors to a new layer, use those layers to trim vectors one way, then another way, to wind up with 2 layers of closed vectors that are ready to toolpath and preview. Along the way, I’ll show you the Layer Manager, how to turn layers on and off, and how to activate each layer so that you’re editing the right vectors.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 11th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.511 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Backing Up and Merging the Tool Database – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner – Part 10

Part 10 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the tenth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this tenth video of the series, we’ll go over how to merge the Tool Database of an older version of the Vectric software with the database of a newer version. I’ll show you how to find the database file in the old version, then merge it with your new version. Along the way, I’ll show you how to backup your tool database for safe keeping, or to merge with an installation on a second computer.

 



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the tenth video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.511 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

The Tool Database

Part 9 Website Thumbnail
The Tool Database Part 9 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

 

This article accompanies the ninth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this ninth video of the series, we’ll go over how to add new bits and tools to the Tool Database. I’ll demonstrate 3 different ways to add a tool, and give you links to a couple of resources that will help you out, big-time. Along the way, I’ll wade into controversial waters by showing you how I determine my default feeds and speeds.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the ninth video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.510 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

End Mills Revisited and YouTube Channel Update

Website Thumb

This article accompanies a video on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

After posting my last two videos, I had so many questions and requests for clarification, I decided to do an update to address these issues.

In my video on bits and end mills the beginner should have on hand, I totally forgot to talk about end mills with a 1/8th inch cutting diameter. In my video on Climb Cutting vs Conventional Cutting I created some confusion about controlling the depth of cut in a v-carve toolpath. I’ll address both issues and try to clear up the confusion I created.



I’ll also do a little bit of shameless plugging of the Trampled Underfoot podcast, and let you know about a YouTube Live Stream I’ll be taking part in on Halloween night, with the Scratchd Podcast Network.

I’m also going to tell you about a YouTube channel that everyone who is even thinking about getting a CNC should be subscribed to – Peter Passuello of CNCnutz.

Finally, I’ll let you know about some changes that are coming to my channel, but I’ll not spoil that here.

Let me reiterate for the absolute CNC beginner; don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the video.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Bits and End Mills for the Absolute Beginner

Bits Website Thumb

This article accompanies another video in a series for CNC beginners on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

In my video about Climb Cutting vs Conventional Cutting. I briefly talked about the difference between and Upcut spiral and a Down Cut spiral bit. I got several questions in emails and private messages on Facebook, asking about what kinds of bits a beginning CNCer should have. I decided to do this video after much hesitation – I thought it would be perceived as just me advertising some bits and end mills.

When I asked people for their thoughts on the matter, the response was overwhelmingly positive – folks were interested in my recommendations, and didn’t care if it looked like advertising.



With that in mind, I went ahead and recorded the video linked below. For the record, I am not endorsed, sponsored, or affiliated in any way with (or by) any tool or bit company I name or link in the video. I placed several links in the description of the video so that you can see exactly what I’m talking about, and get an idea as to what’s out there. Some of those links are affiliate links, which support my channel. Some of the links are not. The point is, I don’t favor one brand over another.

While I’m on that subject, the bits I talk about in the video are in the mid-range, price-wise. I purposely avoided linking the super cheap and super expensive bits. I linked good quality bits that will last, but don’t have a high price tag. I know that there’s a lot of brand loyalty out there when it comes to tools of any description. My goal here was to show the different types of bits – not specific brands. The beginner is going to be learning the machine and doing a lot of experimenting. It makes no sense to experiment with, and possibly ruin, an expensive bit when a mid-range bit will give an excellent finished product. Breaking a $20 bit is a lot easier to swallow than breaking a $40 – $50 bit; especially when you’re just starting out.

For the absolute CNC beginner; don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You don’t have to rush out and spend a ton of cash to outfit your CNC with every bit known to man. There are a few types of bits you should have on hand, in 4 categories, and they should allow you to do almost everything you want to do. Once you have the basics covered, you can expand your collection from there. Remember – cover the basics, then add tools to your collection as you need them.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the video. Thanks for watching!

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of any company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work.

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!